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POLICE / DETECTIVES / PRISON

Page 1

Information - Cliparts and Photos - Vocabulary -
Listening
-
Interactive exercises
- Exercises to print -
Lesson plans
- Debates
- Interactive games - Games to print - Webquests -
Cartoons - Jokes - Stories
- Songs -
Cinema
- TV series - Animations - Videos

(Updated on 01/10/2013)

 


Related pages :

UK RIOTS

Police (UK) + Scotland Yard + Police (US) + Police (UK - History) + Torture
+ Death penalty
+ Death penalty (US) + US. GANGS

+ Violence + TV series

 

 

Information :

A

A Day In The Life Of A Forensic Scientist -
A day's police work (UK) -
Age of criminal responsibility -
Arrested (GB / USA) -
Art Theft (FBI) (USA) -

B
Biometrics - Brazilian police - Britain is 'surveillance society' (GB) - British Bobby (GB) -
C

Camera looks through clothing - CCTV - Children out late 'unacceptable' (GB) -
Civilian investigators
(USA) - Convict escapes using spoon - Cops Train Vulture to Hunt for Bodies -
Crime maps (England and Wales) - Crime scene forensics - Crimemapper - Crimestoppers (GB)
-
Cyber doormen
(USA) -

D

Digital Universe - Dye-bomb -

E
Emergency Numbers around the world -
F

Famous cases (Bonnie and Clyde) (USA) - Famous inmates (Alcatraz) (USA) - Famous mugshots -
Famous prisoners (Tower of London)
(GB) -
Fat policemen
(Mexico) - Fictional Detectives -

G

Geese given police escort on US highway - GPS - Greenville Correctional Center - Guantanamo

H

History of the Metropolitan Police Service - How detectives work -
How pickpockets trick your mind -
How we leave an electronic footprint -

I

Imprisonment for a kiss - Indonesian police shave rockers' hair -
Interpol
-

M

Mafia crackdown -
Man gets 30 months in prison for shining laser at plane -
Metal thefts -
Metropolitan Police and Young people (GB) - Metropolitan Police Crime Mapping (GB) -
Microchip implant - Miranda warning - Mosquito (GB) -

Museum course -

O
Offenders to wear community vests -
P

Pedal patrol car - Pickpocket Methods - Police -
Police have fired tear gas and plastic bullets in Pittsburgh
-
Police officers : Uniforms
-
Police spies stole identities of dead children
Police, Citizens Work to Create Safer Neighborhoods
Prison
- Prison Valley
- Prisoners - Prisons - Private 'police' provoke concern -

R
Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) -
Regional cybercrime hubs launched across England
-
S

Scanners (GB) - Scotland Yard (GB) - SelectaDNA spray -
Sending the Police Before There’s a Crime (US)
-
Silver bells to thwart pickpockets (GB) - Smart dye helps to beat criminals
- Spy helicopter -

T

Terrorist 'pre-crime' detector -
Thieves steal kitchen sink from South Africa police -

U

Unmasking organised crime networks with data
US man freed by DNA evidence after 35 years in prison

V
Violent crimes (GB) -
W
What do the police do ? (GB) -

 

  • How pickpockets trick your mind - 30 June 2014
    "Pickpockets use much more than sleight of hand, says Caroline Williams, they hack your brain’s weaknesses."

    (BBC)
  • Man gets 30 months in prison for shining laser at plane - 26 March 2013
    "In March 2012 Adam Gardenhire aimed a green laser pen at a business jet and then shone it at a Pasadena police helicopter sent to find the source... The act has been considered a federal crime in the US since February 2012."

    (BBC)
  • What do police say when they make an arrest?
    - In America : the Miranda Warning 
    "You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law.
    You have the right to an attorney present during questioning.
    If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you.
    Do you understand these rights?"

    Source : Criminal Justice Major
    - In Australia :
    "You are not obliged to say or do anything unless you wish to do so, but whatever you say or do may be used in evidence. Do you understand?"
    (answers.yahoo.com)

The Miranda warning, "also referred to as Miranda rights, is a warning given by police in the United States to criminal suspects in police custody (or in a custodial interrogation) before they are interrogated to preserve the admissibility of their statements against them in criminal proceedings..."
See :
2 Typical usage
/ 2.1 Use in various U.S. state jurisdictions
14 Equivalent rights in other countries

(Wikipedia)




Miranda rights
- Animation - with activities (brainpop.com)




Miranda Rights: Criminal Law - FindLaw
- Start 0.57 (YouTube)

 

 

  • Lisa Black: Another Glamorous Day In The Life Of A Forensic Scientist
    "If the victim died from a gunshot, I will swab their hands for gunshot residue. If they’ve been beaten, bludgeoned, strangled or stabbed, I will scrape their fingernails for foreign skin and fibers. If they’ve hung themselves, I will mark and remove the ligature. If they were run over by a car, I will look for paint and glass fragments. If it’s a homicide..."

    (leelofland.com)

 

  • Sending the Police Before There’s a Crime
    "The police officers... were directed to the parking structure by a computer program that had predicted that car burglaries were especially likely there that day. The program is part of an unusual experiment by the Santa Cruz Police Department in predictive policing — deploying officers in places where crimes are likely to occur in the future...
    Efforts to systematically anticipate when and where crimes will occur are being tried out in several cities. "

    (nytimes.com)

 

  • Miniature spy helicopter used to hunt pirates
    "It is only seven foot long and weighs just 49lbs but it is the latest weapon in the war on piracy in Africa...
    A remote-controlled mini-helicopter, which can fire tasers, grenades and shotgun shells, is being used to track pirates off the Horn of Africa and enforce law on the streets in the US...
    The discreet Shadowhawk UAV is proving an effective crime-fighting solution for both police forces and private companies."

    ARTICLE + VIDEO
    (telegraph.co.uk)

  • Police (new & USEFUL) scanners - LINK + AUDIO - ACCES PAR MOT DE PASSE
    "Police in England are to use laser scanners at the scene of serious road accidents, so they can clear crashes more quickly.
    The new technology saves officers' time, by making a 3D image of the site."

    (sabironlangues.typepad.fr)

 

  • Crime and ASB in Brighton - interactive map
    ASB = Anti-Social Behaviour
    "This website provides you with helpful information about crime and policing in your area (in England and Wales).
    Enter your postcode, town, village or street into the search box below, and get instant access to street-level crime maps and data,
    as well as details of your local policing team and beat meetings."

    (police.uk)

 

  • Geese given police escort on US highway : Article + Video
    "A Canada goose and her goslings are escorted from a busy highway in Seattle by no less than three police cars...
    The operation "to get the little guys cleared" took around 20 minutes."

    (telegraph.co.uk)
    VOCABULARY :
    1) goose / geese - goslings - the gaggle -  the little guys
    2) police escort - state troopers - motorists - the authorities - officers - patrol spokeswoman
    3) busy highway - rush hour - lanes of traffic - highway exit
    4) after - whilst


 

  • Brazilian police to use 'Robocop-style' glasses at World Cup
    "Brazilian police will use futuristic 'Robocop-style' glasses fitted with facial recognition equipment to identify and root out troublemakers at the 2014 World Cup...
    A small camera fitted to the glasses can capture 400 facial images per second and send them to a central computer database storing up to 13 million faces...
    The camera will generally be used to scan faces in crowds up to 50 metres (164ft) away but can be adjusted, if searching for a specific target, to recognise faces as far as 12 miles away...
    Robocop, the American film of 1987, told the story of a police officer who was killed by criminals but re-created as a cyborg with an array of weaponry and built-in zoom vision."

    (telegraph.co.uk)


  • "Military Police officials from Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro
    have been given demonstrations of how the device works."

    Robocop

 

  • Arizona police force turns to civilian investigators
    "The city of Mesa in the US state of Arizona has turned over some police duties to a new team of civilian investigators.
    The BBC's Paul Adams says the programme is a law enforcement innovation - and policing on the cheap in an era of government cuts."

    + a video
    (BBC)

 



FBI charges 127 alleged mobsters in north-east US - with a VIDEO - 20 January 2011
"US Attorney General Eric Holder said the arrests were part of an ''ongoing fight against organised crime"...
FBI Director Robert Mueller said: "Some believe organised crime is a thing of the past; unfortunately, there are still people who extort, intimidate, and victimise innocent Americans."

See the links with other news sites.
(BBC)

 

 

  • CIA and FBI sent on museum course to 'refresh sense of inquiry'
    "They are among groups of law enforcement officials, also including New York police officers and members of the US Secret Service, who have attended classes at the city's Metropolitan Museum of Art."

    "There's more to a picture than meets the eye."
    "Don't just look at a picture and see a picture. See what's happening."
    (telegraph.co.uk)

 

  • Police call for more powers to tackle metal thefts
    "There have been more than 5,000 such thefts from the railways and the gas and electricity networks this year...
    As prices have risen, memorial plaques, statues and even catalytic converters have become targets.
    "
    (BBC)
  • McDonald’s Serves Up A Side Order Of SelectaDNA
    "ENTRY and exit points at the main McDonald’s restaurant in Rotterdam city centre are being protected from burglary by the installation of the new SelectaDNA intruder spray that uses forensic DNA to link offenders directly to the crime scene... one of the most effective ways to deter commercial burglaries and smash-and-grab raids.
    It can be fitted at multiple entry points of premises such as pubs, restaurants, corner shops, supermarket chains, jewellers, warehouses and petrol stations."

    (selectadna.co.uk)

 

  • It's all in a day's police work
    "Police in Greater Manchester have completed a 24-hour experiment to record every incident they deal with on Twitter.
    They hope it will give the public a better idea of the demands made upon them.
    So what does it reveal about the realities of policing one of the UK's biggest cities?"

    (BBC)

 

  • Thieves steal kitchen sink from South Africa police
    "South Africa's police are investigating after thieves stripped a police station of all its contents, down to the kitchen sink..
    The robbers helped themselves to everything of value - including doors, cupboards, basins, cutlery, tiles, furniture, electrical equipment and mortuary fridges...
    How bizarre, that the police will now have to investigate a crime committed at a police station..."

    (BBC)
  • Cops Train Vulture to Hunt for Bodies
    "German police have trained “Sherlock”, a vulture, to hunt for dead bodies in remote locations...
    Vultures like Sherlock have a keen sense of smell and are able to detect the scent of rotting flesh from 1,000 metres (3,000 feet) up in the air."

    (neatorama.com)

 

  • Pedal patrol car
    "Police in Hampshire, UK, have a new patrol vehicle in their fleet — a five-speed, pedal-powered car:
    Officers believe building their new five-gear vehicle, which has a top speed of 20 miles per hour, will help combat anti-social behaviour.[...]
    PC Keith Waller, who will pilot the vehicle, spent 40 hours painstakingly building the replica car with children aged 13 to 16 at Ringwood Comprehensive School.
    He insisted that getting involved with the project allowed police to show their “fun side” and made them look “cooler” and “more approachable”.

    (presurfer.blogspot.com)

 

 

  • Convict escapes using spoon
    "A violent criminal used a spoon to dig her way out of a Dutch prison...
    The 35-year-old woman, held for an unspecified "violent crime", fled on Saturday night through a tunnel she had dug with a spoon."

    (telegraph.co.uk)

  • US man freed by DNA evidence after 35 years in prison
    "A US man has become the longest-serving prisoner to be freed after DNA evidence proved he was innocent of the crime he was convicted of three decades ago...
    He said the support of his family and his religious faith had helped him get through his ordeal...
    Last year Florida passed a law that means Mr Bain is entitled to $1.75m (£1.08m) for the time he spent in jail while innocent."

    (BBC)

 

  • Private 'police' provoke concern
    "The growing number of private security companies policing UK streets is a worrying development, senior police figures say."
    In Darlington, "residents there pay between £2 and £4 a week to have their homes included in regular patrols and to receive an instant response
    if they need help."

    The vice chairman of the Police Federation said :
    "I understand the public's fear of crime but actually it's the police who patrol public space and we should be very wary about giving those powers to private security companies."

    (BBC)


    "Security guards in Darlington say
    they are filling a vacuum left by the police."
 
  • Police have fired tear gas and plastic bullets
    "at protestors attempting to march to the convention centre where the G20 summit is taking place in Pittsburgh...
    The last G20 summit, held in London, was also marred by serious violence with numerous clashes between protestors and the police.
    "
    (inthenews.co.uk)




2009 G-20 Pittsburgh summit
"The second G20 2009 summit will hopefully evaluate the measures taken in April 2009 in London and implement new policies which will stimulate
the global economy."

(Wikipedia)


  • Silver bells to thwart pickpockets.
    "Shoppers are being given pairs of silver bells to attach to wallets, mobile phones and handbags in a bid to stop pickpockets in Somerset, England.
    Police hope people will be able to hear if they have become a victim of theft."

    (BBC)


  • Children out late 'unacceptable'
    "Home Secretary Jacqui Smith says it is unacceptable for parents not to know what their children are up to at night.
    She was speaking after police in 27 council areas in England picked up and returned 120 youngsters late on Friday.
    Operation Staysafe was intended to stop children becoming victims of crime or being drawn into criminal behaviour."

    (BBC)
  • Offenders to wear community vests
    "Thousands of offenders in England and Wales are to wear high visibility vests while doing community service."
    + AUDIO
    (BBC News)

 

 

  • Crimemapper
    An interactive map of crime reports in the Sacramento region

    (crimemap.scoopytube.com)
    "You write in the address of a home, residence, school, etc.; click, and you are then shown a map of the area with markers explaining what crime was committed where and when over the past year.
    A program like this has tons of possibilities for English Language Learners and others.  Students could analyze their neighborhood  crime’s statistics and compare it with others, then discuss the reasons for differences.
    They could look at the stats and organize a meeting with police to discuss any concerns they and their families might have.
    And these are just two of many ideas."

    (Larry Ferlazzo)

 

  • Smart dye helps to beat criminals
    "In a UK first, a man has been convicted of robbery thanks to forensic evidence from a special dye which carries a unique chemical signature
    linking him to his crimes...

    When a cash box from a security van is stolen and opened it triggers a dye-bomb inside the box which covers the thief and his haul....
    it is invisible to the naked eye but when put under UV light it glows green."

    - with a VIDEO
    (BBC)

 

  • INTERPOL :

  • Mireille Ballestrazzi
    "INTERPOL’s current President is Mrs Mireille Ballestrazzi elected at the INTERPOL General Assembly held in Rome in November 2012. Mrs Ballestrazzi will serve as President until 2016."

    See Professional experience / Decorations / Qualifications / the role of the President
    (interpol.int)



     

  • About INTERPOL
    "INTERPOL is the world's largest international police organization, with 186 member countries. Created in 1923, it facilitates cross-border police
    co-operation, and supports and assists all organizations, authorities and services whose mission is to prevent or combat international crime..."

    The word 'INTERPOL' is a contraction of 'international police'.
    (interpol.int)

    About INTERPOL :
    General Secretariat - Member countries - National Central Bureaus - Governance - History - Legal materials - Distinctive signs -
    Commission for the Control of INTERPOL's files / Core functions /
    News Drugs and criminal organizations /
    Financial and high-tech crime /
    Fugitives /
    Public safety and terrorism /
    Trafficking in human beings /
    Corruption /
    Other crime areas /
    Regional activities /
    International liaison /
    Publications Recruitment

 

  • Interpol (Wikipedia)
    1 History - 2 Methodology - 3 Member states - 4 Fictional Interpol Agents - 5 External links

 

  • Interpol's five priority crime areas (interpol.int)
    Drugs and organized crime / Financial and High-tech Crime / Public safety and terrorism / Trafficking in human beings / Fugitives

 

 

  • CCTV :


    1 History
    2 Industrial processes
    3 Crime prevention and detection
    4 Monitoring for safety
    5 Closed Circuit Digital Photography (CCDP)
    6 Traffic monitoring
    7 Privacy
    8 Fears of technological developments
    9 Retention, Storage and Preservation
    10 Special uses...

     

    • CCTV boom 'failing to cut crime'
      "Huge investment in closed-circuit TV technology has failed to cut UK crime, a senior police officer has warned...
      an "utter fiasco" - with only 3% of London's street robberies being solved using security cameras. "

      + New database
      (BBC)

     

     

 

  • Microchip implant (human)
    "A human Microchip Implant is an integrated circuit device or RFID tag encased in silicate glass and implanted into a human's body.
    Such implants can be used for information storage, including personal identification, medical history, medications, allergies, and contact information."

    (Wikipedia)



  • BIOMETRICS :


    • Fingerprint breakthrough offers new forensic evidence - 4 August 2011
      "A technology to extract fingerprints from a crime scene could show if a criminal suspect has taken drugs or been in contact with explosives.
      This could provide new information about a suspect's actions and habits."

      (BBC)

     

     

    • Examples of Biometric Systems (biometrics.org)
      Face - Multimodal - Fingerprint / Palm Print Retinal -
      Hand and Finger Geometry - Vein - Handwriting - Various/Others -
      Iris - Voice/Speaker

     

    • Biometric passport (Wikipedia)
      1 Types of biometric passports
      1.1 European biometric passports
      1.2 American biometric passports
      1.3 Australian biometric passports
      2 Opposition
      2.1 Dutch biometric passports
      2.2 The RFID-Zapper
      3 The U.S. biometric passport program
      3.1 History
      3.2 Participants
      4 External links

     

    • How Biometrics Works (howstuffworks.com)
      With the help of Q, James Bond can easily past a security system that requires the villain's irises,
      his voice and the shape of his hand to get inside. Real-life businesses and governments are using biometrics -- technology that identifies you based on your physical or behavioral traits -- for added security.
      Learn about biometric systems.

 

  • Radio-frequency identification (RFID)
    "is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders.
    An RFID tag is an object that can be applied to or incorporated into a product, animal, or person for the purpose of identification using radiowaves.
    Some tags can be read from several meters away and beyond the line of sight of the reader..."

    (Wikipedia)

 

  • Global Positioning System (GPS)
    "Utilizing a constellation of at least 24 Medium Earth Orbit satellites that transmit precise microwave signals, the system enables a GPS receiver
    to determine its location, speed, direction, and time..."

    (Wikipedia)

 

  • New Study Forecasts Explosive Growth of the Digital Universe; Spotlights Worldwide Phenomenon of "Digital Shadow"
    "For First Time the "Digital Shadow" - Amount of Digital Information Being Generated About People -Surpasses the Amount They Create Themselves;
    Digital Universe Bigger Than Estimated Due to Explosion of Digital Cameras, Digital TVs, Surveillance Cameras and Social Networks."
    + a video
    (marketwire.com)

 

 

  • Police to focus on violent crimes
    "Police in England and Wales are to have targets on minor offences relaxed to allow them to focus on combating violent crime, it is understood... Schoolchildren may have to pass through metal detectors"

    (BBC)

 

  • Rise of the cyber doormen
    "Doormen are the eyes and ears of New Yorkers, providing a personalised service to their residents and acting as a filter to the outside world at the
    same time. Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week."

    (BBC)

 

  • Call to scrap 'anti-teen' device
    "A high-pitched device used to disperse teenagers is being challenged by campaigners, who say it is not a fair way to treat young people. There are estimated to be 3,500 of the devices, known as the mosquito, in use across the country. Their sound causes discomfort to young ears - but their frequency is above the normal hearing range of people over 25. The Children's Commissioner for England says they should be scrapped as they infringe the rights of young people."
    (BBC)

 

  • Fat policemen ordered to diet - UPDATED
    "More than 400 policemen in a Mexican city have been ordered to go on a diet. Senior officers in Aguascalientes say they are too fat to do their jobs properly. Las Ultimas Noticias reports that about 15% of policemen in the city are considered to be obese. A police spokesman said: "They have to keep up with the new policemen who are all in good shape. "If they continue to be so fat they won't be even able to chase a turtle!"
    (www.dailytimes.com.pk)

    "Les autorités de la ville d'Aguascalientes, dans le centre du Mexique, veulent faire maigrir leurs policiers souvent obèses: une prime de 100 pesos (environ 7 euros) par kilogramme perdu leur est promise à titre d'encouragement."
    (20minutes.fr)

 

  • Metropolitan Police - Young people
    "This part of the site specifically targets the youth of London, delivering useful guidance on crime prevention and how to stay
    safe. The site also offers advice such as what to do if your mobile phone is stolen or if you are being bullied."

    (met.police.uk)

 

  • Scotland Yard (Wikipedia)
    1 History
    2 Popular culture
    3 See also
    4 Notes
    5 External links


 

 

 

  • PRISONS :



     

     

    • Prison Valley - Un webdocumentaire
      "Bienvenue à Cañon City, Colorado.
      Un coin reculé de 36.000 âmes et 13 prisons, dont «Supermax», la nouvelle Alcatraz américaine.
      Une ville-prison où même ceux qui vivent dehors vivent dedans..." 

      (prisonvalley.arte.tv)




    • Joe Arpaio
      = "a law enforcement officer and the sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona, United States.
      Arpaio, who promotes himself as "America's Toughest Sheriff", is controversial for his approach to operating
      the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office
      ."
      (Wikipedia)


      + Official site (mcso.org)

      + See ARIZONA

    • Prison (Wikipedia)
      1 Prisons in the criminal justice system
      2 Military prisons
      3 Political prisons
      4 World prison populations
      5 Prisons in the United Kingdom
      6 Prisons in the United States of America

     

    • ADX Florence (Wikipedia)
      "The United States Penitentiary Administrative Maximum Facility (ADX) in Florence is a supermax prison in Florence, Colorado. Also known unofficially as ADX Florence, Florence ADMAX, Supermax, or the Alcatraz of the Rockies,
      it is operated by the federal government..."
      1 History - 2 The prison - 3 Psychological effects - 4 Human rights - 5 Prisoners - 6 External Links

     

    • Prisons in the United States (Wikipedia)
      1 Conditions of imprisonment - 2 Privatization - 3 Federalism - 4 Sentencing -
      5 Security Levels
      - 5.1 Super max - 5.2 Maximum Security - 5.3 Close Security - 5.4 Medium Security - 5.5 Minimum Security -
      6 California - 7 Population Statistics - 8 Comparison with other countries - 9 Notes and references -
      10 See also - 11 External links


    • GUANTANAMO :

     

     

     


 

 

  • Art Theft - FBI (fbi.gov)
    Overview / Stories / Top 10 Cases / Art Crime Team

 

 

  • Police (Wikipedia)
    1 Introduction
    2 Police armament and equipment
    3 Police compared to military
    4 Difficult issues
    5 Policing structures
    6 Various police agencies
    7 For concepts, see also:
    8 Police methods, services, and tactics
    9 Ethical issues related to police
    10 Notable historical police personalities...